Different Memory Generations have different Speeds on Server Memory


First, what we need to talk is DDR, DDR is a double data rate, what is already the memory. Since the GDR has come out, it has continued through a few generations of DDR, DDR2, DDR3 and now DDR4. These different memory generations have different speeds, as the maximum throughput is increased by technology.

DDR2 speeds

image from ClickBD

The DDR2 was new in 2003 and started with a maximum transfer rate of 3200MB / s. Over time, the transfer rates DDR2 were available at 4266, 5333 and 6400.

DDR3 speeds

image from Kingston Memory Shop

DDR3 came in 2007 and hence higher speeds. There are other standards that go beyond the maximum transfer rate as the data rate, which is measured in MT / s, as well as the I / O Busuhr, but for convenience, we will maintain the maximum transmission speed this article DDR3 started at a speed of 6400 are used more often than the speeds 8533, 10666 and 12800.

DDR4 speeds

image from Montage Technology

In 2012, JEDEC, the company that oversees technical specifications for uniformity, published standards for DDR4. This brought the new DDR4 memory with peak transfer, including 12800, 14933, 17066 and 19200MB / s. As with the other transitions to the latest memory speeds available in the last generation, they are all less useless when higher speeds are widely accepted.

At each new generation, we have differences in the keyhole, which is a slot to ensure that the correct memory module is used. Other server memory variations are unbuffered, fully saved or logged in. The difference is how the memory responds to the information provided. Insufficient memory usually has no error and error correction and is therefore not an ECC. While fully buffered, and the recorded memory contains error checking and correction.

This chip communicates directly with the CPU, then distributes the information to be processed, and then adds the memory modules of other chips. For unmanned memory, the CPU must send the information to each chip in the memory module. This means an increased CPU load when using unbuffered vs. registered or fully buffered memory. Fully buffered, widely used DDR2 DDR3 has been moved from him and has only registered or buffered.
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